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20131202
20131210
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. in the maya city of copan, a jeweler fashioned rare shell and jade for his powerful lord. in mexico, living artisans echo the economy of a vanished civilization. and in teotihuacan, evidence of mass production has now been unearthed. tiny faces of clay reflect the men and women who made them a thousand years ago. on the other side of the world, in the ancient roman city of ostia, huge merchant ships were part of an economy much like our own. and today, the tanners of morocco still practice their ancient craft, living proof that economies have evolved out of the past. everyone who has ever lived has been part of an economic system. iel bote grande...mil pesos! economic systems are simply the ways people produce, distribute and consume things -- everything and anything, from tortillas to stocks and bonds. for 10,000, 10,000 an eighth. today, as in the past, economic systems lie at the heart of how a society is organized. archaeologists search for these systems because they believe economies hold the key to understanding ancient societies. archaeologist william sanders. the economy of any give
." you miss out. you miss out. you got to be fast, you got to be fast. lonesome city, honey, lonesome city. you strike out. they're getting along fine at least you can feel happy for them, right? next week comes, you go to another church, the reverend type says, "all right, all you lonesome hearts "out there, we're gonna get together today, "1:00 today we're gonna get a bus trip together, "we're gonna go picnicking. "so all you new folks, come on, we all get to celebrate life. we get to meet each other, come on, 1:00 come on, huh," 1:00 come, youet in a bus. different color bus, th time it's a green bus, okay? you get on the bus, you go out to the hang-gliding territory, watch the hang gliders soar, huh? a little further upstream, okay? you're sitting down, they put out the big tablecloth, thkentucky fried chicken, the kool-aid, the mcdonald's, the burger kings, whatever. all of them right out there, right? you ait checki out the food. what are you checking out? potential friend again. and son of a gun, there's an even more delightful person, okay, bam, bam, bam, bam. gets up, walks o
in this city, and they say, "you know, this doctor told me to do this, what should i do?" i tell them to go to an academic medical center. now, are they as user-friendly as, you know, the slick private clinics out there? no, they're often not, but the science and the knowledge is there. do they invariably have the art that a good, homey, family-medicine doctor will have? no. no. i don't take any pride in the fact that we haven't been able to get everybody to have a good bedside manner, but the science is there. and sometimes it's worthwhile to just gird your belt and accept a big academic medical center so you can get the best opinion you can. of course, i want to see diplomas on the wall, and, you know, i want to see that they've been published and all that sort of thing. but, to me, far more important is the doctor's ability to connect with me as a human being. the relationship between doctor and patient-- that human connection-- plays a role in the healing process that sometimes goes beyond degrees and scientific knowledge. marc shiffman: there are 11 residents down here at various leve
spectacular. >> then, farming in the city? sound impossible? not for these folks. >> this is my land, but it's everybody's land. >> next, meet a farmer and a chef who make the perfect pair--terally. >> i think pears are great because they're--i like the versatility. >> then, ever wonder how to pick the best summertime produce? we've got the tricks of the trade from a pro. it's all ahead, and it starts now. [moo] >> here in the tiny town of santa margarita, they have a population of only 1,300. but what they lack in size, they more than make up for in history. that's thanks to its legendary occupant, the santa margarita ranch, one of the oldest, continuously operated cattle ranches in california, and one that draws oohs and ahs from both its visitors and owners. >> the overall tme is, wow, it's pretty spectacular. most people that look at it, just go, ooh, blows you asay. >> this was the most idyllic place in the county. and i really do believe, today, it is truly one of the crown jewels of san luis obispo county. >> i don't know that i've ever been able to explain how i fell in love with the
years old, he apprenticed with a painter in his native city of antwerp in the southern netherlands. by t time he was 16, his skill and talent aowed h to join the workshop of eleing, peter paul rubens. rubenscomplex compositions, such as these with their sculpturally modeled figures, greatly influenced the young artist. but even in van dyck's earliest works we see the artist's ow distinctive ylemerging. he painted this scene of st. jerome when heas about 16. instead of the heroic figures rens, van ck chose to show the hermit saint as a man past s prime. though van dyck based his composition on a work by ruben the young artist painted it difrently, applying his paint thickly with rough, broken strokes, exaggerating the naturalism of the biblical scene. in another version of the same subjec painted just a few years later, van dyck portrays st. jerome in y a different manner. in a moment of deep religious fervor, the saint is about to strike his chest in penance ( o) this interesin psyogical intensity, human emotis, and cral momen wou mark v dyck'wo ughout h career. van dyck again looked to
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5